Monuments

The majority of lots at Morris Hill Cemetery lie from east to west (feet to the east, head to the west). It is customary to place the markers so that they can be read (facing east) while not standing on the grave of the person who's marker you are reading. Traditionally, couples are "buried as they are married" - husband on the right, wife on the left (facing east).

Because Morris Hill Cemetery is old but still in use, there are many older stones among the newer ones. The oldest sections are in the north-west corner of the cemetery. When Emerald Street was widened, many of the graves in Section 2 were moved to Section T, which is on the south east side of the cemetery.

There are some wonderful monuments exhibiting ceramic pictures of the deceased. By Col. Green's mausoleum in Section E, there is a picture of a bearded gentlemen and his wife who were buried in the early 1900's. In Section 5, there is a memorial monument to a young airman, shot down over Goose Bay during World War II. In Silent Camp, there is a monument to a Civil War veteran, Richard Congdon Ball, his remains were placed there in May of 1922, brought to Boise from Illinois by his grandson.